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Latex Gloves – Are You Allergic?


Many industrial manufacturing environments require workers to wear protective gloves, including during electronics and medical device production and assembly. Latex gloves not only protect workers from harmful chemicals but also protect products from worker contact and contamination during manufacturing Read more

ST 925 SMT Rework System–Three favorites combined into one nice savings


Save a few steps--and some money--with the Pace 925 SMT Rework System Pace has introduced a new low-cost “combination” system ideal for surface mount technology (SMT) rework. It’s worth adding up the savings by comparing the a la carte prices Read more

Metcal’s CV-5200 Connection Validation Soldering Station Changes Everything


You may or may not have heard about Metcal’s new soldering station, the CV-5200. The evolutionary tool removes much of the reliance on visual inspection of hand-soldered joints and adds a second, more technology-driven method for validating a successful Read more

Latex Gloves – Are You Allergic?

Posted on by Andy in Uncategorized Leave a comment

Many industrial manufacturing environments require workers to wear protective gloves, including during electronics and medical device production and assembly. Latex gloves not only protect workers from harmful chemicals but also protect products from worker contact and contamination during manufacturing and assembly processes.

Minor vs. Fatal Latex Glove Allergic Reactions

Allergies to latex gloves are well-known, and reactions extend from minor irritations (Type IV), such as itching, to severe, life-threatening reactions (Type I) similar to those associated with peanut allergies. Latex gloves can be made with synthetic materials or of natural rubber, but only natural rubber latex gloves can trigger severe allergic reactions.

People with extreme allergies to natural rubber latex can go into anaphylaxis shock, caused by the protein in natural rubber gloves. The body’s immune system reacts to what it considers to be a harmful substance by producing immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies that are released into the bloodstream each time the person is exposed, causing the allergic reaction to increase.

Anaphylactic reactions develop instantly after latex exposure in highly sensitive people, but anaphylaxis usually doesn’t happen the first time.

 

Mayo Clinic signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis –

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Hives or swelling
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Wheezing
  • Drop in blood pressure
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Confusion
  • Rapid or weak pulse

Type IV allergic reactions, however, are much more common and usually result from exposure to the accelerator groups of chemicals used during manufacturing to “cure” the gloves. Accelerators work to strengthen the physical properties and improve the performance of polymers used in rubber and synthetic (nitrile) latex gloves. In particular, thiurams and carbamates, and to a lesser degree thiazoles, aldehydamines and guanidines chemicals might cause reactions.

Anaphylactic shock symptoms

Allergic reaction treatment includes applying medications and moisturizers and possibly taking antibiotics, should a secondary infection occur. If needed, like other allergy desensitization methods, a patient’s tolerance can be built up by administering measured doses of the allergen, i.e., allergen immunotherapy.

An easier method for reducing unwanted reactions would be to avoid the allergen. First, however, the allergy needs to be confirmed by a medical specialist. Are the gloves responsible for the reaction?  A simple patch test would confirm whether the gloves are responsible wherein the skin is scratched and purposely exposed to known latex chemical irritants.

Latex glove labeling should clearly include the accelerators used during the manufacturing process so that the test for allergies can be easily and effectively determined if needed. Knowing this information can help get to the root of the cause faster and save time and money by reducing possible downtime or medical bills.

Only about 1% of the population is allergic to latex gloves and gloves made without using latex are available; however, they generally do not provide as much protection.

Mayo Clinic mild and severe symptom identification –

Mild symptoms
  • Itching
  • Skin redness
  • Hives or rash
More severe symptoms
  • Sneezing
  • Runny nose
  • Itchy, watery eyes
  • Scratchy throat
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Wheezing
  • Cough

Our thanks to QRP Gloves & Fingercots for providing this valuable information to the manufacturing community. QRP – makers of specialized finger cots and latex, nitrile and vinyl gloves.

Compare all gloves using All-Spec’s glove comparison chart – disposable gloves, reusable gloves, finger cots and cleanroom


ST 925 SMT Rework System–Three favorites combined into one nice savings

Posted on by Andy in All-Spec News, New Products, SMT rework station, Solder rework Leave a comment

Save a few steps–and some money–with the Pace 925 SMT Rework System

Pace has introduced a new low-cost “combination” system ideal for surface mount technology (SMT) rework. It’s worth adding up the savings by comparing the a la carte prices versus the three-piece combo price. And currently, All-Spec has the total system for $3,680, more than $200 less than the advertised price.

The system comes with a fully programmable, self-contained hot air rework station;a high-powered, no contact infrared preheating system; and an adjustable, hands-free stand.

The ST 925 rework system easily handles surface mount component removal; installation of leaded components with solder paste; and components without visible leads, such as BGAs, MLFs, LGAs and LCCs. Although nozzles don’t come with the system, you’ll have a selection of 80 different types.

Find detailed specs online for each product in the Pace 925 SMT Rework System package deal.

 

 


Metcal’s CV-5200 Connection Validation Soldering Station Changes Everything

Posted on by Andy in All-Spec News, Industry News, New Products, Product Spotlight Leave a comment

You may or may not have heard about Metcal’s new soldering station, the CV-5200. The evolutionary tool removes much of the reliance on visual inspection of hand-soldered joints and adds a second, more technology-driven method for validating a successful solder joint connection.

How does the Metcal CV-5200 soldering station work?

When the ring turns green, you’ve made the connection. Metcal CV – 5200 Connection Validation Soldering Station

Using sophisticated hardware and software components, the integrated system assesses the quality of a solder joint by calculating the intermetallic compound formation (IMC)  while providing closed loop feedback to the operator. Once the IMC is calculated, an LED light encircling the handpiece turns green to indicate a quality solder joint.

With this development, the risks and variables associated with soldering activity and the validation of a successful or unsuccessful solder joint are removed from the operator’s hands. Instead, the quality of a solder join is determined through an objective method that adds repeatability and a measurable standard to the soldering process.

A few of the benefits associated with the Metcal CV-5200 Connection Validation Soldering Station

Reduces Risk and Improves Quality –  decreases solder joint flaws by validating the intermetallic compound (IMC) formation in a soldered joint

Adds Repeatability and Measurable Standards – increases process controls through the LED light ring embedded in the handpiece. The light turns green signals the operator when a successful solder joint has been made. Complements the visual industry inspection standard

Improves Audit Compliance – the Chip-in-Cartridge technology precisely calculates and displays the tip temperature

Have questions about the Metcal CV-5200 Connection Validation Soldering Station? Contact All-Spec for information.


Seven Things to Know About Qualifying Your Product to a U.S. Military Specification (MIL-SPEC)

Posted on by Andy in All-Spec News, New Products, Product Spotlight, Vendor News, Vendor Spotlight Leave a comment

Qualifying the SCS 81705 Series anti-static shield bags to military standards

There are a few, sometimes complicated steps to go through before your product can qualify for a particular military specification. SCS recently introduced their new 81705 Series static shield bags and film qualified to MIL-PRF-81705E Type III, Class 2. The qualification didn’t happen overnight and the process can be quite involved including the required, very specific markings on the bags and film.

What makes these SCS 81705 Series anti-static shield bags so special?

First, they meet MIL-PRF-81705E Type III, Class 2 qualifications, frequently linked to higher-level assembly protection such as in military, medical and aerospace markets. Each SCS 81705 bag contains four layers of protection – static dissipative coating, polyester, metal and polyethylene laminate. The polyester dielectric works with the metal layer to create discharge shielding. The static dissipative outside wall allows electrostatic charges to be removed when grounded.

Qualification military specification (MIL-Spec) basics

1. What are the United States defense standards?

They’re often referred to as military standard (MIL-STD) or military specification (MIL-SPEC), and they help meet the standardization objectives set by the U.S. Department of Defense. The defense standards may also be used by other non-defense government organizations (NGOs), technical organizations and industry.

2. How do I apply for qualification?

You apply in writing and each application contains the number and date of the specification, desired testing, as well as the type, grade, class, or other specification designation of the product. The application also includes the brand designation for the product and where the product was manufactured. If you’re a distributor, you’ll also receive a CAGE code.

Example – MIL-PRF-81705E Type III, Class 2 – MIL (military) PRF (document Id/Performance), 81705E (document number), Type III (document type), Class 2 (document class)

3. What is the QPL?

The qualified products list (QPL) is a listing in the qualified products database (QPD) of items successfully subjected to a defined set of qualification and periodic tests using processes, worst case designs or materials to verify the end product’s design, performance, quality, and reliability.

4. What do the general DOD qualification steps look like?

 

5. Where can I get the required MIL-Spec testing done for qualifying my product?

You can have testing done in a laboratory operated by or under contract to the government, or a laboratory used by the manufacturer or distributor either in the plant or one that’s under contract.

6. Where do I find my product listed once I’m qualified?

Once a product meets the recognized qualification requirements, the product will be listed online in the Qualified Products Database (QPD). The QPD can be accessed through the acquisition streamlining and standardization information system (ASSIST).

7. What does a qualification not do?

A qualification does not –

• Relieve the supplier of his contractual obligation to deliver items meeting all specification requirements.
• Guarantee acceptability under a contract
• Waive any requirements for inspections or for maintaining quality control measures satisfactory to the Government
• Relieve the original equipment manufacturer of contractual obligations to ensure that delivered items (including the qualified items used in the equipment) comply with all specification requirements

For all available information on qualifying your product to military standards, visit the Defense Standardization Program website.

All-Spec currently has a selection of the new SCS 81705 Series static shield bags and film on sale for 10% off through May 31, 2017. Learn more about the 81705 Series of bags and film, check out the TDS Film and TDS Bags specs or shop all products now.


Get Lean with 5S Workplace Principles

Posted on by Andy in Electronic Assembly organization, Lean manufacturing Leave a comment

5S – Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize and Sustain

Recognized as one of the strategies associated with “Just in Time” manufacturing (Toyota Production System), the 5S system for workplace organization and standardization originated in Japan. The “5” relates to a series of five Japanese words that begin with the letter “S” and translate into five English words, i.e., sort (seiri), set in order (seiton), shine (seiso), standardize (seiketsu) and sustain (shitsuke).

Since then, the workplace tool has spread to many other industries including health care, education and government and has been repeatedly modified, such as adding a sixth “S” word, safety.

Generally, the five S’s eliminate any unnecessary things so workers focus only on necessary items. As a result, the path stays clear to make room for optimum work production.
Five words to help you organize and standardize your workplace

1. Sort

Inventory and sort through your items removing any unnecessary objects.
Need a push to help you identify the non-essentials? If you haven’t used it in the past 30 days, then remove it.

2. Set in order

Organize and order the tools and materials you’ll need. Keep them close and in the order you’ll need them, i.e., FIFO—first-in, first-out.

3. Shine

How would your workspace look to someone at a distance of 50 feet? Clean, neat, uncluttered?

4. Standardize

As the old saying goes, a place for everything and everything in its place.

5. Sustain

Maintain proper order and discipline. Carry out the task before you’re asked.
All-Spec carries an assortment of items to help you organize and standardize your workspace. Take a first step with Treston’s Cornerstone™ Non-ESD Preconfigured Workstation.


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