Logging Data Into Your Weller WX Station

by Michelle R. on January 22, 2016

Weller WX

 

You know about the many features that Weller’s WX system offers. Intuitive interface, global language support, a touch screen viewable from all angles, intelligent tool recognition— the list goes on. But do you know how to log data with your WX station?

Weller University is now offering a free downloadable training document that gives you details on how to harness the power of this functionality. From connecting the WX to your PC to transferring data to other WX stations, all the bases are covered.

The main benefits in accessing these features are:

  • Monitor and log performance data in real time for up to three channels simultaneously through PC software via wired USB connection
  • Simple and easy data logging from station USB port to USB stick without wired connection to PC and work disruption
  • Chart and save in Excel for analysis
  • Use data to monitor and chart processes, operator solder training and certifications or analysis and improvement of soldering processes

Download the brochure here.

Weller soldering stations are known for being top-of-the-line. Hisco is proud to offer these Weller stations and many more Weller products to complement your soldering processes. Call us or visit us online today to learn more!

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You Have to Clean, But Which Cleaner is Best?

by Michelle R. on January 19, 2016

When it comes to cleaners, the question isn’t which brand should one use. The question is which Branson model should one use. Here’s an easy-to-follow guide for choosing the right Branson model for your needs. First, look at the different Branson models available for your application. Do you need a large tank? A smaller tank? The size of the tank is dependent on your desired application. Once you have selected your model, go to the next step.

Second, look at the different cleaning solutions for your application. Will you be cleaning medical/dental devices? Jewelry? Electronics? Choosing the cleaner best suited for your job will yield optimal results.

One thing you won’t have to look for is the right price and the best service when you shop All-Spec. By choosing All-Spec, you are guaranteed access to the best brands at a cost that will keep your bottom line clean. Call us or visit us online today!

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The Care and Keeping of Your Hakko Soldering Iron

by Kathy S. on January 15, 2016

The Care and Keeping of Your Hakko Soldering IronYour shiny, new soldering iron tips won’t stay that way for long. But, with proper maintenance, you can help ensure the quality results you expect from your quality iron. Hakko recommends five do’s and don’ts for lower melt times, cleaner solders and a longer iron life.

  1. Don’t reshape your soldering iron tip.

Filing or grinding the tip can cause permanent damage. Instead, buy replacement tips in the different shapes and sizes you need; it’s much more economical in the long run.

  1. Do tin your tip.

With each use, and after any long pauses, be sure to add a fresh dollop of solder to the tip in order to tin it. This helps to remove any leftover oxide. Tip tinners and cleaners that are a mixture of solder paste and flux can also be used to help remove oxides.

  1. Do clean your tip.

You do need to clean your tip frequently, and if you need to take a break longer than an hour, or you are working at temperatures above 665◦F, you’ll need to clean the tip before you resume soldering.

  1. Do use a proper sponge.

When you clean your tip, use a damp, synthetic sponge—no rags or fabrics.

  1. Don’t use tap water.

Tap water may contain contaminants and should be avoided. Do dip your sponge in distilled water before cleaning the tip of your soldering iron.

Following a few simple steps can extend the life of your soldering iron to its maximum and keep your tips gleaming in the process.

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Controlling Static Through the Ages--What You Need to Know TodayMethinks ESD has been a problem since the 1400s. Consider gunpowder stores in military forts. Even before Shakespeare’s time, soldiers were charged with keeping them uncharged for fear of blowing them up. By the 1860s, paper mills were thwarting ESD in the drying process via grounding, flame ionization techniques and steam drums.

What does that mean for 2016 processes and beyond? Today’s electronics manufacturers are continually innovating to offer customers better, more cost-efficient solutions. While costs associated with latent damage are difficult to pinpoint, industry experts estimate average product loss as high as 33 percent. Even with technological advances, ESD continues to impact virtually every aspect of the global electronics environment. In fact, as electronic devices advance, our voltage tolerance decreases as well as our capacity for heat dissipation.

To mitigate some risks associated with modern processes, a new range of dissipative materials based on fluoroelastomer and perfluoroelastomer polymers has been designed for wafer processing and wafer handling applications. Of course, you’ll want to make sure these materials are compatible with your specific process environment and with the devices themselves. It is important to note, however, that with the correct material and precautions in place, you can continue to combat ESD in the future without getting medieval.

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From the Ground Up--3 Steps to Stopping Static for GoodGuarding your sensitive equipment from the ravages of static electricity can be daunting, especially if you have to outfit an entire team of engineers with static-safe materials. Knowing the requirements of your particular environment is the first step.

The second step? Know your dissipative mat. Whether you need it for the floor, table or workstation, make sure you understand its specifications—like RTG versus RTT. Do you know the difference?

Resistance to Ground (RTG) is the resistance from the mat to the ground point. It is the primary measurement for general auditing purposes. This measurement ensures your mat conducts a charge from a point on the surface to the ground point. The guideline in ESD STM-7.1 for RTG is 1×106 to 1×109 ohms. ANSI/ESD S-20.20 has an upper limit of <1×109 ohms.

Resistance to Top (RTT), also called Resistance to Point, is the resistance from one point on the mat’s surface to another, which is measured to help ensure consistent resistance. The ESD STM-7.1 guideline for RTT is >1×106 ohms.

When it comes to equipping your entire facility, staying on budget is also critical. Your third step is to shop All-Spec. All-Spec’s selection of ESD-safe benchtop and floor mats runs the gamut. And, at All-Spec prices, you can easily equip your team—and maybe a few others—with all the tools it needs to run smoothly.

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