Free LOCTITE Webinars Take the Scary Out of AdhesivesAfraid to try adhesives? Worried they’ll make too big a mess or won’t be reliable? Think again.

Today’s adhesives are making a clean sweep. Used as an alternative to mechanical fastening, welding and other joining methods, adhesives are relied upon daily—and rightly so. Engineers around the globe use them because they are a viable, cost-effective solution for industrial production processes.

For almost every application, adhesives beat nuts and bolts. In threadlocking, for example, vibration, shock and temperature changes cause nuts and bolts to loosen. When this happens, equipment failure is all but inevitable, costing millions of dollars every year. Adhesive solutions for structural bonding reduce labor costs and fill large gaps between parts.

Interested in gasket sealing? No problem. Sealants prevent fluids and gases from leaking by creating strong, impervious barriers.

If you’re considering an adhesive solution for your business, consider some free advice from Henkel, the industry leader. All-Spec has partnered with Henkel to offer an exclusive, four-part, LOCTITE webinar series during February and March. Attend one or all of these one-hour, live sessions.

Just by attending, you’ll receive:

  • Free, on-site process review by LOCTITE engineers
  • Free equipment trials
  • Access to exclusive offers and information
  • $50-savings on LOCTITE Syringe Dispensing System Kit (#883976)

Don’t be afraid to click here for more information or to register; adhesives can help you achieve that much needed competitive advantage.

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Rework-ing Best Practices You Can Implement Today

by Kathy S. on December 29, 2015

Rework-ing Best Practices You Can Implement TodayEquipment failure. It’s still a major problem even with the recent uptick in automated processes. Faulty mass soldering continues to require the reflow work of a deft hand. But how do you ensure successful manual soldering when the process is so highly dependent upon an individual operator’s skill level?

Consider the following best practices from CircuitMedic to streamline the hand soldering process:

  1. Fine-Pitch Gull Wing Soldering
  • Clean and prepare pads; apply liquid flux to corner pads.
  • Position the component and align pads.
  • At one corner, place tip at the junction between the pad and component lead. Solder the component in place.
  • Wait for solder to solidify, and solder the opposite corner.
  • Place small diameter solder along the edge of the component leads.
  • Place tip against the solder in line with the tip of the first component lead to be soldered. A uniform amount of solder will flow, creating a consistent solder joint.
  • Move tip down the line until all leads along the side are soldered.
  1. Auxiliary Heat Desoldering for Multilayer Circuit Boards
  • Apply a small amount of liquid flux to joints of the component to be removed.
  • Place tip against the lead on the board’s component side.
  • Align desoldering tip with a component lead end; contact the joint lightly.
  • When solder melts, begin rotating the desoldering tip.
  • Continue to rotate until a change in the motion is detected.
  • As soon as the solder in the joints is completely molten, activate the vacuum and extract the solder.
  • Remove the desoldering tip and the soldering tip from the component lead.
  • Desolder remaining component leads using a skipping method to reduce thermal buildup.
  • Probe component leads to ensure they are not soldered to the side of the plated hole; remove component.
  1. BGA Dog Bone Masking
  • Inspect dog bones under a microscope to determine if solder mask is needed.
  • Scrape away loose solder mask and solder connecting the BGA pad to the via.
  • Seal the exposed copper with a small amount of high-strength epoxy.
  • Process BGA normally.

Depending on your application and environment, follow the above steps and help ensure successful handiwork is always within your reach.

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How to Conduct Rework without Going Haywire

by Kathy S. on December 22, 2015

How to Conduct Rework without Going HaywireOops! Found another design error? Sometimes designers who fail to validate the schematic, layout and board risk wasting time on rework and wire tacking. And, sometimes wire tacking seems to be a necessary evil in an ever-changing design environment.

Jumper wires, also called wire tacks and patch wires, are discrete electrical connections that are part of the original design. The purpose of these additional wires is to bridge portions of the conductor pattern formed on a printed board. Haywires, on the other hand, are discrete electrical connections that are added to the board in order to modify the basic conductor pattern.

When do you need to add them? Well, you might need additional wires if a design flaw appears in production and test. Also, you might need additional wires if an upgrade or modification is needed, and it’s not possible to scrap the boards. Sometimes a damaged board requires a repair involving additional wires.

However, not all rework options require jumper wires or haywires. Take a look at this rework option case study from CircuitMedic. Here, circuit patterns were corrected using flat ribbon conductors.

Whichever option you choose, experts advise careful consideration of all proposed rework methods based on your unique situation—before your board goes completely haywire.

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Combatting Computer Vision Syndrome--Is Your Task Lighting Up for the TaskDo you suffer from headaches, blurred vision or eye strain? You could have computer vision syndrome (CVS). CVS affects about 90 percent of people who spend three hours or more a day at a computer.

One of the biggest culprits? Inadequate lighting. Improper lighting exacerbates the problem and also reduces productivity, and yet the amount of light in the workplace remains one of the most common complaints. Specifically, ambient lighting is frequently too high and task lighting too low. Glare from computer screens and light sources also leads to unwanted aches and pains.

With ergonomic lighting, the problems associated with CVS are typically alleviated, and operational efficiencies improve. Proper and adjustable task lighting at every workspace is necessary to mitigate the symptoms of CVS.

Your lighting needs will vary by task and by your age; reading, for example, requires more light than computer work, and a 60-year-old needs more light than a 20-year-old. Task lights with adjustable arms and dimming controls provide maximum flexibility. When your workspace is properly lit, the entire space should be illuminated, and glare should be minimized.

Improve well-being, productivity and job satisfaction with All-Spec’s selection of ergonomic task lighting for every task, and combat the serious effects of CVS in the workplace.

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4 Tips to Solder Tip Selection

by Kathy S. on December 15, 2015

4 Tips to Solder Tip SelectionThe wrong soldering tip can quickly turn a routine task into a train wreck. With so many different types of tips on the market, it’s easy to get derailed. The best tip is to know which tip is the best tool for your specific task before you begin. Here are four of the more common ones, so you can always stay on track:

Chisel Tip: Perhaps the most common of soldering tips, the chisel tip is easy to use and serves multiple purposes. This is a good tip type for beginners. It’s ideally suited for creating smooth joints and smoothing over solder deposits.

Pointed Tip: Need to do small, detail work? Reach for the pointed tip. It’s great for moving solder around once it’s been deposited. Use it to create small solders and pinpoint where you want your solder material to land. Beginning and advanced users rely on the pointed tip.

Rounded Tip: The rounded tip offers stability in soldering and is used for depositing solder and for creating strong joints. It’s a solid choice for both beginners and advanced users.

Mini Wave Hollow Tip: The hollow tip features a small well that holds solder material at the tip. This makes it easy for depositing. Beginning and advanced users choose the hollow tip to move solder around while it’s still hot.

Need help figuring out which tip goes with which system? Visit All-Spec’s tip selection guide, and find the perfect tip for your task every time.

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